UNEXPECTED TRANSFORMATIONS — SEPT. 10

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While studying in Africa, young Jessica Speight, an anthropology student, was struck by the vision of children with “lobster claws,” children whose abnormalities would haunt her. In the midst of these impressionable moments, Jessica would ponder her feelings and wonder if their impact on her was a foreshadowing of things to come.

When she has an affair with her married professor, the consequences would be far-reaching. The child born changed Jess’s academic future, but also took her into a whole new kind of life. For the child, Anna, was delightful, with a sunny nature: described as “a pure gold baby.” But what that meant, ultimately, was that Anna was not “normal,” and over the years would display various special needs, changing family life for Jess and Anna. There would be private schools and boarding schools. There would be an enhanced connection between Jess and Anna, a symbiotic connection, if you will.

Jess and Anna’s story is told by another parent with whom the two have a friendship. Someone who is almost like part of their extended family; someone who narrates in what seems to be a “plural” voice, as if there are several storytellers. There is a sense of an extra layer between the storyteller and Jess: a slight detachment. Almost an omniscience about the narration. It also has an essence of being told after the fact, which also places distance between the narration and the characters.

Sometimes I had difficulty engaging with The Pure Gold Baby, as the narrator would shift onto her own issues, while remaining in the first person voice she used when talking about Jess and Anna. I would then lose focus and have to reread several paragraphs to find my way again. The story also felt repetitive and weighed down with historic details and issues that were important, but didn’t require repeating. All of these elements lent a tedium to the tale.

Overall, the story, which spanned several decades, from 1960s London to the 21st Century, revealed how one promising young academic lost her way in her initial journey, and found another one. Her almost complete focus on Anna might have been her only way to absorb herself in this new life. In the end, she takes a trip back to Africa with Anna and some friends, hoping to find something obviously missing, or to remember what was. And realizes that nothing is as it seems, even though she has come full circle. 3.5 stars.

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