ONE CHILD & ONE WOMAN ON A COLLISION COURSE WITH DANGER — A REVIEW

In a complex world of the juvenile court system in San Diego County, bureaucrats and individual social workers struggle daily to save the children in danger. For one social worker, Bo Bradley, the daily battle is enhanced because of her own condition of manic-depression (bipolar disorder). Only one person with whom she works knows of this condition—her friend and colleague, Estella Benedict. But whenever the symptoms begin to reappear, a difficult job becomes almost impossible.

When one day a four-year-old boy, tied to a mattress in an old shack on an Indian reservation, is rescued by an old Indian woman, life just got a whole lot harder. Saving the boy, who turns out to be deaf, from whoever hurt him and is still trying to kill him, becomes a full-time obsession for Bo Bradley. Like a one-woman army on a hunt-and-capture mission, she digs into the clues at hand, flies to a neighborhood in Houston, Texas, and begins to realize that the only way to save the boy is to hide him.

Intermingled with the tale of rescuing the boy called “Weppo,” the author weaves a bit of Bo’s history, including the loss of her own sister—also deaf and plagued with manic-depression–many years ago. A Native American theme casts Child of Silence and its characters into a tapestry of mysticism and spiritualism that lends beauty and hope to the story of one child and one woman on a collision course with danger.

Five stars!

PREDICTABLE MURDER ROMP….

The other day, I was thinking about movies I’ve enjoyed over the years, and thought of this film starring Burt Reynolds and Theresa Russell—from the late 80s.

Physical Evidence was a flick that I thought would be fun to see again.  And it was.

My favorite parts were the interactions between the characters.  Theresa Russell portrayed a defense attorney named Jennifer Hudson, while Burt Reynolds was Joe Paris, the cop on trial for murder.

Watching the growing attraction between these characters as they tried to solve the case (in between trial scenes) was fun, if a bit predictable.

The movie was set in Boston, so I also enjoyed the street scenes, as well as the interiors of some really gorgeous homes, like the loft where Theresa Russell’s character lived with her very annoying fiance, who was materialistic and a bit of an obsessive-compulsive snob.

Lots of action, some violence, and a few thrill scenes, especially toward the end—all added up to a so-so movie that I’ll probably watch again, but it certainly wasn’t one of my favorites.  Not like I thought it would be, since back in the eighties I obviously had different tastes.

However, I decided that it deserved three stars.