TUESDAY SPARKS: “THE ROANOKE GIRLS”

Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by The Purple Booker.

Today’s feature is a recent download:  The Roanoke Girls, by Amy Engel, shocks and tantalizes, twisting its way through revelation after mesmerizing revelation, exploring the secrets families keep and the fierce and terrible love that both binds them together and rips them apart.

 

Intro:  (Prologue)

The first time I saw Roanoke was in a dream.  I knew little of it beyond its name and the fact it was in Kansas, a place I had never been.  My mother only ever mentioned it when she’d had too much wine, her breath turned sweet and her words slow and syrupy like molasses.  So my subconscious filled in the rest.  In my dream it stood tall and stately, tucked among a forest of spring-green trees.  Its red-brick facade was broken up by black shutters, white trim, delicate wrought-iron balconies.  A little girl’s fantasy of a princess castle.

***

Teaser:  I ease the list out from underneath its magnet without really knowing why.  It feels like the closest I’ve gotten to Allegra since I’ve been back, as if her essence is embedded in this forgotten scrap of paper, and I don’t trust Sharon to keep it safe.  I flip the paper over, hoping, maybe, for some more personal message.  But it’s just a drugstore receipt from Parsons, a larger town about forty-five minutes from Osage Flats (p. 56).

***

Synopsis:  “Roanoke girls never last long around here. In the end, we either run or we die.”

After her mother’s suicide, fifteen year-old Lane Roanoke came to live with her grandparents and fireball cousin, Allegra, on their vast estate in rural Kansas. Lane knew little of her mother’s mysterious family, but she quickly embraced life as one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls. But when she discovered the dark truth at the heart of the family, she ran…fast and far away.

Eleven years later, Lane is adrift in Los Angeles when her grandfather calls to tell her Allegra has gone missing. Did she run too? Or something worse? Unable to resist his pleas, Lane returns to help search, and to ease her guilt at having left Allegra behind. Her homecoming may mean a second chance with the boyfriend whose heart she broke that long ago summer. But it also means facing the devastating secret that made her flee, one she may not be strong enough to run from again.

As it weaves between Lane’s first Roanoke summer and her return, The Roanoke Girls shocks and tantalizes, twisting its way through revelation after mesmerizing revelation, exploring the secrets families keep and the fierce and terrible love that both binds them together and rips them apart.

***

What do you think?  Do you want to keep reading?

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TUESDAY SPARKS: “SLIGHTLY SOUTH OF SIMPLE”

Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by The Purple Booker.

Today’s feature is a review book sent to me by the author, Kristy Woodson Harvey.  Slightly South of Simple is filled with Southern charm, emotional drama, and plenty of heart.  I took it to dinner tonight, and enjoyed reading while eating the kind of soup I imagine the characters in the book enjoy:  potato cheese soup. 

 

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Intro:  (Prologue – Ansley) – Seagulls

I still have dreams about that yellow-and-white striped bikini, the one I was wearing the night I met Jack, my first bona fide summer love.  I was fifteen going on sixteen, the perfect age, when your hair tints that summer blond that hairstylists become superstars for emulating.  You have filled out enough not to be gangly but not so much that you can imagine a one-piece being in your future.

We spent those bikini summers in Peachtree Bluff, my family and I, at my grandmother’s waterfront home, the one that I didn’t realize until years later was truly something special.  It was always blissful, always enchanted, but that summer, Sandra and Emily, my two best friends, and I spent nearly every day at Starlite Island across from Grandmother’s house.  It was only a few boat lengths across the sound, but you couldn’t swim there and needed at least a kayak to go.  It felt like freedom.

***

Teaser:  (Inhumane – Caroline)

The worst part about your husband leaving you when you’re pregnant is that there is no alcohol of any kind involved.  I mean, how are you supposed to heal when you can’t drink your troubles away?  It’s really quite inhumane, if you ask me. (p. 115).

***

Synopsis:  From the next “major voice in Southern fiction” (New York Times bestselling author Elin Hilderbrand) comes the first in an all-new series chronicling the journeys of three sisters and their mother—and a secret from their past that has the potential to tear them apart and reshape their very definition of what it means to be a family.

Caroline Murphy swore she’d never set foot back in the small Southern town of Peachtree Bluff; she was a New York girl born and bred and the worst day of her life was when, in the wake of her father’s death, her mother selfishly forced her to move—during her senior year of high school, no less—back to that hick-infested rat trap where she’d spent her childhood summers. But now that her marriage to a New York high society heir has fallen apart in a very public, very embarrassing fashion, a pregnant Caroline decides to escape the gossipmongers with her nine-year-old daughter and head home to her mother, Ansley.

Ansley has always put her three daughters first, especially when she found out that her late husband, despite what he had always promised, left her with next to nothing. Now the proud owner of a charming waterfront design business and finally standing on her own two feet, Ansley welcomes Caroline and her brood back with open arms. But when her second daughter Sloane, whose military husband is overseas, and youngest daughter and successful actress Emerson join the fray, Ansley begins to feel like the piece of herself she had finally found might be slipping from her grasp. Even more discomfiting, when someone from her past reappears in Ansley’s life, the secret she’s harbored from her daughters their entire lives might finally be forced into the open.

***

I’m thoroughly enjoying this book.  When I’ve had my fill of thrillers for a bit, I grab a family story like this one that reminds me of how much mother/daughter bonds (and even conflicts) are just what I need…in between the dark tales.  What do you think?  Would you keep reading?

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TUESDAY SPARKS: “THE CUTAWAY”

Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by The Purple Booker.

Today’s feature is my current read, an ARC from Amazon Vine:  The Cutaway, by Christina Kovac, is a striking debut that will haunt you long after you reach the last page.

 

Intro:  It began with someone else’s story.  In the beginning, a woman went out to meet a man, and on her long walk, she disappeared.  I didn’t know the woman.  I’d never met her.  But I could see her clearly in my mind, walking the streets of Georgetown, her heels striking the sidewalk to the percussive music booming out of city bars.  That same path I’d traveled many times myself.

Her married name was Evelyn Carney.  She’d been born a Sutton, small town country club people hailing from the cold north.  I didn’t discover much about her people, except they seemed to have no time for her or to care very much about what she did, and when she disappeared, gave a collective shrug.  Had she fled them, or was she like so many other young women, women like me, who’d come to D.C. with dreams of making herself anew?  She had none of the typical means to success in the District, no powerful sponsor or academic prowess or massive wealth.  She had no family connections, either.  But she had ambition and a powerful appeal to men, and she wasn’t afraid to use either.

***

Teaser:  The dashboard clock in my car read 11:48, which meant, if I had any hope of catching up with Ben, my next stop would be one of the northwest bars featured in his night life.  Ben’s philosophy boiled down to this:  people were pack animals and it was unnatural for such an animal to be alone. (p. 89).

***

Synopsis:  When brilliant TV news producer Virginia Knightly receives a disturbing “MISSING” notice on her desk related to the disappearance of a beautiful young attorney, she can’t seem to shake the image from her head. Despite skepticism from her colleagues, Knightly suspects this ambitious young lawyer may be at the heart of something far more sinister, especially since she was last seen leaving an upscale restaurant after a domestic dispute. Yet, as the only woman of power at her station, Knightly quickly finds herself investigating on her own.

Risking her career, her life, and perhaps even her own sanity, Knightly dives deep into the dark underbelly of Washington, DC business and politics in an investigation that will drag her mercilessly through the inextricable webs of corruption that bind the press, the police, and politics in our nation’s capital.

***

What do you think?  Does it grab you, making you want to keep reading?

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY! THE MANY FACES OF FIONA…

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Happy birthday, Fiona!  She is a young woman who defines her own unique path…and has been doing so from the beginning.  Let’s look back at her early moments: the newborn…

 

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Then, at around eighteen months, the curly-haired tot clutched her toys, with cousin Aubrey in pursuit…at a family gathering.

 

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A few years ago, Fiona and her “twin cousin” Aubrey (their birthdays are only days apart), were the featured header for this blog…back when it was called Snow Impressions and Connections.

Here they were, at seven years of age, at the snowy cabin owned by Aubrey’s father.

 

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Some pictures of the two of them, growing up:

 

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Fiona has enjoyed showcasing various looks over the years:

 

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She went through a “hat” phase after shaving her head….

 

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And here is one of my favorites:

 

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We can definitely conclude that Fiona is creative and pursuing her own unique identity in life.

As she celebrates her twentieth birthday, we wish for many more years of fun and experimentation…and finding who she is along the way.

I am linking this post to West Metro Mommy Reads, for Saturday Snapshots.

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TUESDAY SPARKS: “LILLIAN BOXFISH TAKES A WALK”

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Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by The Purple Booker.

Today’s feature is a new download:  Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk, by Kathleen Rooney.   “Extraordinary…hilarious…Elegantly written, Rooney creates a glorious paean to a distant literary life and time—and an unabashed celebration of human connections that bridge past and future.
Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed)

 

 

 

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Intro:  (The Road of Anthracite)

There once was a girl named Phoebe Snow.  She wore only white and held tight to a violet corsage, an emblem of modesty.  She was not retiring, though, and her life spun out as a series of journeys through mountain tunnels carved from poetry.  I never saw her doing anything besides boarding, riding, or disembarking a train, immaculate always, captivating conductors, enchanting other passengers.

No, there wasn’t.  She was just an advertisement:  the poster girl for the Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western Railroad.  Her unsoilable Antarctic-colored clothes were proof that the line’s anthracite-powered locomotives were clean-burning, truly—unlike their sooty and outfit-despoiling competitors:

     Her laundry bill for fluff and frill

     Miss Phoebe finds is nearly nil.

     It’s always light, though gowns of white,

     Are worn on Road of Anthracite.

***

Teaser:  When the book came out five months later, under the title I desired, it was a smash, selling out its print run within the first thirty days and hurrying through four subsequent printings.  The reading public, at least some of them, wanted a break from the Depression, and found repose in my pose, world-weary but still cheery. (p. 52).

***

Synopsis:  “In my reckless and undiscouraged youth,” Lillian Boxfish writes, “I worked in a walnut-paneled office thirteen floors above West Thirty-Fifth Street…”

She took 1930s New York by storm, working her way up writing copy for R.H. Macy’s to become the highest paid advertising woman in the country. It was a job that, she says, “in some ways saved my life, and in other ways ruined it.”

Now it’s the last night of 1984 and Lillian, 85 years old but just as sharp and savvy as ever, is on her way to a party. It’s chilly enough out for her mink coat and Manhattan is grittier now—her son keeps warning her about a subway vigilante on the prowl—but the quick-tongued poetess has never been one to scare easily. On a walk that takes her over 10 miles around the city, she meets bartenders, bodega clerks, security guards, criminals, children, parents, and parents-to-be, while reviewing a life of excitement and adversity, passion and heartbreak, illuminating all the ways New York has changed—and has not.

A love letter to city life in all its guts and grandeur, Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney paints a portrait of a remarkable woman across the canvas of a changing America: from the Jazz Age to the onset of the AIDS epidemic; the Great Depression to the birth of hip-hop.

Lillian figures she might as well take her time. For now, after all, the night is still young.

***

I like the sound of this quirky character.  What do you think?

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TUESDAY SPARKS: “THE VANISHING YEAR”

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Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by The Purple Booker.

Today’s “spark” comes from a recent download:  The Vanishing Year, by Kate Moretti.  The Vanishing Year is a stunner. A perfectly compulsive read that’s impossible to put down.” –Mary Kubica

“A chilling, powerful tale of nerve-shattering suspense.” –Heather Gudenkauf

 

 

 

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Intro:  April 2014, New York City

Lately, I’ve been dreaming about my mother.  Not Evelyn, the only mother I’ve ever known, the woman who raised me and loved me and taught me to swim in the fresh water of Lake Chabot, bake a sticky sweet pecan pie, fly-fish.  I’ve thought about Evelyn plenty in the five years since she died—I’d venture to say every day.

My dreams lately are filled with the mother I’ve never met.  I imagine her at sixteen years, leaving me in the care of the neonatal nurses.  Did she kiss my forehead?  Study her baby’s small wrinkled fingers?  Or did she just scurry out, as fast as she could, hugging the wall, ducking the shadows to avoid detection until she burst through the doors, into the night air, where she could breathe again?

***

Teaser:  The Saturday after Henry proposed, I had fled to the shop at six a.m., breathless and heady, in the clothes I’d worn the day before, my hair matted and bed-tousled, smelling of Henry’s cologne and the warm, soft, slight musk, of sex. (51%).

***

Synopsis:  Zoe Whittaker is living a charmed life. She is the beautiful young wife to handsome, charming Wall Street tycoon Henry Whittaker. She is a member of Manhattan’s social elite. She is on the board of one of the city’s most prestigious philanthropic organizations. She has a perfect Tribeca penthouse in the city and a gorgeous lake house in the country. The finest wine, the most up-to-date fashion, and the most luxurious vacations are all at her fingertips.

What no one knows is that five years ago, Zoe’s life was in danger. Back then, Zoe wasn’t Zoe at all. Now her secrets are coming back to haunt her.

As the past and present collide, Zoe must decide who she can trust before she—whoever she is—vanishes completely.

A “dark, twisty, edge-of-your-seat suspense” (Karen Robards), The Vanishing Year combines the classic sophistication of Ruth Rendell and A.S.A. Harrison with the thoroughly modern flair of Jessica Knoll. Told from the point-of-view of a heroine who is as relatable as she is enigmatic, The Vanishing Year is an unforgettable new novel by a rising star of the genre.

***

I love the sound of this one already!  What do you think?  Let’s share our reading.

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TUESDAY SPARKS: EXCERPTING “DEATH AT BREAKFAST”

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Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by Books & a Beat.

Today’s features is one of my newest downloads from a favorite author.  Death at Breakfast, by Beth Gutcheon, the first entry in a stylish and witty mystery series featuring a pair of unlikely investigators—a shrewd novel of manners with a dark heart of murder at its center, set in small-town New England.

 

 

 

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Intro:  Maggie Detweiler, new-minted woman of leisure and not at all sure she was going to like it, had no sense of impending tragedy as she posed in front of the broad stone veranda of the Oquossoc Mountain Inn that bright October morning.  She didn’t really know what made her say to Hope, “When your picture’s being taken, don’t you always wonder if it’s the one that will run with your obituary?”

“Well, that one won’t be,” Hope Babbin said, consigning the image to the digital trash can.  “Hold still and smile, will you?”

Maggie did.

***

Teaser:  Sophie and Ada were sitting in the great room, waiting.  They burst into tears as they heard, at last, the sound of the dog’s scrabbling toes on the slate floor of the hall.  As Colette rushed toward them they were rushing the other way, into the two women’s arms.  They shook and sobbed there. (50%).

***

Synopsis:  Indulging their pleasure in travel and new experiences, recently retired private school head Maggie Detweiler and her old friend, socialite Hope Babbin, are heading to Maine. The trip—to attend a weeklong master cooking class at the picturesque Victorian-era Oquossoc Mountain Inn—is an experiment to test their compatibility for future expeditions.

Hope and Maggie have barely finished their first aperitifs when the inn’s tranquility is shattered by the arrival of Alexander and Lisa Antippas and Lisa’s actress sister, Glory. Imperious and rude, these Hollywood one-percenters quickly turn the inn upside-down with their demanding behavior, igniting a flurry of speculation and gossip among staff and guests alike.

But the disruption soon turns deadly. After a suspicious late-night fire is brought under control, Alex’s charred body is found in the ashes. Enter the town’s deputy sheriff, Buster Babbin, Hope’s long-estranged son and Maggie’s former student. A man who’s finally found his footing in life, Buster needs a win. But he’s quickly pushed aside by the “big boys,” senior law enforcement and high-powered state’s attorneys who swoop in to make a quick arrest.

Maggie knows that Buster has his deficits and his strengths. She also knows that justice does not always prevail—and that the difference between conviction and exoneration too often depends on lazy police work and the ambitions of prosecutors. She knows too, after a lifetime of observing human nature, that you have a great advantage in doing the right thing if you don’t care who gets the credit or whom you annoy.

Feeling that justice could use a helping hand–as could the deputy sheriff—Maggie and Hope decide that two women of experience equipped with healthy curiosity, plenty of common sense, and a cheerfully cynical sense of humor have a useful role to play in uncovering the truth.

***

What do you think?  Does this one captivate you?  Would you keep reading? 

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TUESDAY SPARKS: EXCERPTING “TWO IF BY SEA”

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Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, from Tuesday/First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by Books & a Beat.

Today’s feature is a book I hope to start reading soon:  Two If By Sea, by Jacquelyn Mitchard, an epic story of courage and devotion that spans three continents and the entire map of the human heart.

 

 

 

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Intro:  So many things happen when people can’t sleep.

It was always hot in Brisbane, but that night was pouty, unsettling.  After getting Natalie and her family comfortable in their rooms at the inn, Frank couldn’t rest.  His leg plagued him.  The toll of oppressive weather on that kind of old injury was no old farmer’s myth.  He rambled around, briefly joining Natalie’s brother Brian in the bar on the beach, then painfully mounting the switchbacked decks of wooden stairs that led to a kind of viewing platform just adjacent to the car park, looking out over Bribie Island Beach.  Up there, he hoped the signal would be good enough to call home, his home, if home is the place you started.  For Frank, that would always be a ramshackle horse farm in south-central Wisconsin—now probably more ramshackle than when he last saw it, three years before.  As the brrrr on the other end began, his pulse quickened.  He looked up at the sky and thought of all the calls darting through the sea of radio waves tonight, swift as swallows—dutiful, hopeful, wistful, sad.

***

Teaser:  That was it.  Claudia was tired.  And other hallucinations.  Life was hurling events at the two of them like a pitching machine stuck on fastball.  Claudia was at her limit. (57%).

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Synopsis:  Just hours after his wife and her entire family perish in the Christmas Eve tsunami in Brisbane, American expat and former police officer Frank Mercy goes out to join his volunteer rescue unit and pulls a little boy from a submerged car, saving the child’s life with only seconds to spare. In that moment, Frank’s own life is transformed. Not quite knowing why, Frank sidesteps the law, when, instead of turning Ian over to the Red Cross, he takes the boy home to the Midwestern farm where he grew up. Not long into their journey, Frank begins to believe that Ian has an extraordinary, impossible telepathic gift; but his only wish is to protect the deeply frightened child. As Frank struggles to start over, training horses as his father and grandfather did before him, he meets Claudia, a champion equestrian and someone with whom he can share his life—and his fears for Ian. Both of them know that it will be impossible to keep Ian’s gift a secret forever. Already, ominous coincidences have put Frank’s police instincts on high alert, as strangers trespass the quiet life at the family farm.

The fight to keep Ian safe from a sinister group who want him back takes readers from the ravaged shores of Brisbane to the middle of America to a quaint English village. Even as Frank and Claudia dare to hope for new love, it becomes clear that they can never let Ian go, no matter what the cost. A suspenseful novel on a grand scale, Two If by Sea is about the best and worst in people, and the possibility of heroism and even magic in ordinary life.

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What do you think?  Read more?  I know that I’m eager to keep going.

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TUESDAY SPARKS: INTROS/TEASERS – “SHE CAN HIDE”

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Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, from Tuesday/First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by Should Be Reading.

Today I am reading She Can Hide, another book in the mystery series authored by Melinda Leigh.

 

 

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Intro:  A whoosh and soft impact jolted Abby’s body.  She slid forward.  The seat belt caught her and snapped her back.  Pain ripped through her temple.  What happened?  Her vision blurred, and she rubbed her eyes to clear it.

The steering wheel and dashboard came into focus.  She was sitting in the front seat of her Subaru sedan.  Ice pellets bounced off her windshield.  When had it started to sleet?  Blinking hard, she stared through the glass.  Water splashed over the hood.

Oh my God.

***

Teaser:  Ethan looked down at his notebook.  So far, all he’d written was doesn’t remember two hours before accident. (p. 22).

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From Amazon:  From the moment Officer Ethan Hale pulls Abby Foster from icy waters, he senses there’s more to her than meets the eye. Abby has no memory of the accident that submerged her car in the frozen river. Three years ago, Abby was kidnapped and abandoned in a well for a week. The botched police investigation nearly killed her. Abby had moved to the mountains of Pennsylvania for a fresh start, but when it becomes clear that this car crash wasn’t an accident, she knows the violence from her past has caught up with her.

But Abby’s former assailant was convicted and imprisoned, so who else wants her dead?

Ethan uncovers a fresh string of murders tied to Abby’s past. Someone is trying to kill her, and this time the stalker seems determined to finish the task. As the killer grows bolder, Abby begins to trust Ethan enough to share the truth, her heart, and her life. But to stop the murders, Ethan must make a decision that could jeopardize it all.

***

I love the sound of this one, and having enjoyed every previous book in this series, I am eager to keep reading.  What do you think?

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TUESDAY SPARKS: INTROS/TEASERS – “THE ARSONIST”

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Welcome to another Tuesday celebrating bookish events, from Tuesday/First Chapter/Intros, hosted by Bibliophile by the Sea; and Teaser Tuesdays hosted by Should Be Reading.

Today’s spotlight is on an ARC from Amazon Vine:  The Arsonist, by Sue Miller.

 

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Intro:  Later, Frankie would remember the car speeding past in the dark as she stood at the edge of the old dirt road.  She would remember that she had been aware of the smell of smoke for a while.  Someone having a fire, she had assumed then, and that would turn out to be correct—though not in the way she was imagining it.  She had the quick thought, briefly entertained amid the other, rushing thoughts that were moving through her tired brain, that it was odd for someone to be doing this, having a fire this late—or this early—on an already warm summer night.

But in the moment she didn’t go beyond her quick assumption, her fleeting thought.  She smelled the smoke, she saw the car approaching, and she got quickly out of the road, stepping first into the ditch that ran alongside it, and then, because it was night and she worried that the driver might not see her in the dark, onto the scrubby bank, pulling herself up between two trees that stood there.  By the time she turned around to face the road again, the car had passed her.  She stood for a moment watching as the wink of the red taillights disappeared behind a rise in the road, appeared again, dropped from sight and appeared once more; and then was gone, the car’s sound fading into nothing, into the rustle and odd croak of the night.  She’d been walking for more than an hour by then, awash in memories and images of the life she’d just left behind.

***

Teaser:  Sylvia had felt her own life so completely ordinary next to his that she barely sketched it in.  She didn’t stop to consider until later, much later, that this had seemed ample information to him, that he didn’t press her for details the way she had pressed him—though it was clear he was taken with the ease and privilege of her background. (p. 75).

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Amazon Description:  From the best-selling author of While I Was Gone and The Senator’s Wife, a superb new novel about a family and a community tested when an arsonist begins setting fire to the homes of the summer people in a small New England town.

Troubled by the feeling that she belongs nowhere after working in East Africa for 15 years, Frankie Rowley has come home—home to the small New Hampshire town of Pomeroy and the farmhouse where her family has always summered. On her first night back, a house up the road burns to the ground. Is it an accident, or arson? Over the weeks that follow, as Frankie comes to recognize her father’s slow failing and her mother’s desperation, another house burns, and then another, always the homes of summer people. These frightening events, and the deep social fault lines that open in the town as a result, are observed and reported on by Bud Jacobs, a former political journalist, who has bought the local paper and moved to Pomeroy in an attempt to find a kind of home himself. As this compelling book unfolds, as Bud and Frankie begin an unexpected, passionate affair, arson upends a trusting small community where people have never before bothered to lock their doors; and Frankie and Bud bring wholly different perspectives to the questions of who truly owns the land, who belongs in the town, and how, or even whether, newcomers can make a real home there.

Suspenseful, sophisticated, rich in psychological nuance and emotional insight, The Arsonist is vintage Sue Miller—a finely wrought novel about belonging and community, about how and where one ought to live, about what it means to lead a fulfilling life. One of our most elegant and engrossing novelists at her inimitable best.

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I am loving this book, as I have enjoyed every book by this author.  Immediately engaged by the characters, I am having trouble setting it down.  Would you keep reading?

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