HUMP DAY SPARKS: CURRENT, PAST, & FUTURE READING

Today I’m participating in Sam’s WWW Wednesdays Here’s how it works:

 

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next, and/or what are you eagerly awaiting?

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CURRENTLY READING:

He Said, She Said (e-book), by Erin Kelly (NetGalley – 6/6/17), one reader says:  “a gripping, twisting, furiously clever read that asks all the right questions, and keeps you guessing until the very end. I loved it.”

 

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BOOKS FINISHED SINCE LAST WEEK:

Click titles for my review

Not a Sound (e-book), by Heather Gudenkauf (NetGalley – 5/30)

 

The Night the Lights Went Out (e-book), by Karen White

 

The Widow of Wall Street (e-book), by Randy Susan Meyers

 

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EAGERLY ANTICIPATING:

The Other Girl (e-book), by Erica Spindler – Release Date – 8/22/17

 

I love this author’s books, so I am excited about this one.

Blurb:   From the New York Times bestselling author of Justice for Sara and The First Wife Erica Spindler comes The Other Girl, a chilling new thriller about a ritualistic murder of a college professor that sends a small town cop back into the trauma she thought she’d put behind her.

A horrific crime. One witness—a fifteen year old girl from the wrong side of the tracks, one known for lying and her own brushes with the law.
Is it any surprise no one believed her?

Officer Miranda Rader of the Harmony, Louisiana PD is known for her honesty, integrity, and steady hand in a crisis—but that wasn’t always so. Miranda comes from the town of Jasper, a place about the size of a good spit on a hot day, and her side of the tracks was the wrong one. She’s worked hard to earn the respect of her coworkers and the community.

When Miranda and her partner are called to investigate the murder of one of the town’s most beloved college professors, they’re unprepared for the brutality of the scene. This murder is unlike any they’ve ever investigated, and just when Miranda thinks she’s seen the worst of it, she finds a piece of evidence that chills her to the core: a faded newspaper clipping about that terrible night fifteen years ago. The night she’d buried, along with her past and the girl she’d been back then. Until now that grave had stayed sealed…except for those times, in the deepest part of the night, when the nightmares came: of a crime no one believed happened and the screams of the girl they believed didn’t exist.

Then another man turns up dead, this one a retired cop. Not just any cop—the one who took her statement that night. Two murders, two very different men, two killings that on the surface had nothing in common—except Miranda.

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My kind of read!  What are you reading and anticipating this week?

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HUMP DAY SPARKS: A WEEK OF READING…

Today I’m participating in Sam’s WWW Wednesdays Here’s how it works:

 

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next, and/or what are you eagerly awaiting?

***

CURRENTLY READING:

Not a Sound (e-book),by Heather Gudenkauf, an e-ARC from NetGalley (5/30/17 release date). 

A shocking discovery and chilling secrets converge in this latest novel from New York Times bestselling author Heather Gudenkauf….

 

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BOOKS FINISHED SINCE LAST WEEK:

(Click titles for my reviews)

 

Vivian in Red (e-book), by Kristina Riggle

 

Hot Milk (e-book), by Deborah Levy

 

A Mother’s Confession (e-book), by Kelly Rimmer

 

What’s Become of Her, by Deb Caletti (Amazon Vine Review)

 

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EAGERLY ANTICIPATING:

Good Me, Bad Me, by Ali Land

 

I’ve been eyeing this book for a while…and today I ordered a paperback copy, which should be arriving within the next couple of weeks.  Have any of you read it?

Synopsis:  Milly’s mother is a serial killer. Though Milly loves her mother, the only way to make her stop was to turn her in to the police. Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity, a home with an affluent foster family, and a spot at an exclusive private school.

But Milly has secrets, and life at her new home becomes complicated. Her foster sister, Phoebe, starts to bully her. A teacher betrays her trust. And her new best friend tempts her into behaving badly. They have no idea who they are dealing with.

As her mother’s trial looms, with Milly as the star witness, Milly starts to wonder how much of her is nature, how much of her is nurture, and whether she is doomed to turn out like her mother after all.

When tensions rise and Milly feels trapped by her shiny new life, she has to decide: Will she be good? Or is she bad? She is, after all, her mother’s daughter.

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What was your week like?  Stop by and let’s chat.

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MONDAY SPARKS: MUSING ABOUT BOOKS….

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It’s Monday, and time to muse along with The Purple Booker.  Check out these topics:

 

Musing Mondays is a weekly meme that asks you to choose one of the following prompts to answer:

I’m currently reading…
Up next I think I’ll read…
I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
I can’t wait to get a copy of…
I wish I could read ___, but…
I blogged about ____ this past week…

THIS WEEKS RANDOM QUESTION: Are there any books you are really eagerly waiting for in 2017?

My current read is The Dry, by Jane Harper, and it is an engaging murder mystery set in drought-ridden Australia.

 

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After getting a note demanding his presence, Federal Agent Aaron Falk arrives in his hometown for the first time in decades to attend the funeral of his best friend, Luke. Twenty years ago when Falk was accused of murder, Luke was his alibi. Falk and his father fled under a cloud of suspicion, saved from prosecution only because of Luke’s steadfast claim that the boys had been together at the time of the crime. But now more than one person knows they didn’t tell the truth back then, and Luke is dead.  Amid the worst drought in a century, Falk and the local detective question what really happened to Luke. As Falk reluctantly investigates to see if there’s more to Luke’s death than there seems to be, long-buried mysteries resurface, as do the lies that have haunted them. And Falk will find that small towns have always hidden big secrets.

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I love books with secrets!  Has anyone read this one?

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Tomorrow, January 31st, I have several books that I want to download.  Here are two of them.

Right Behind You, by Lisa Gardner

 

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Eight years ago, Sharlah May Nash’s older brother beat their drunken father to death with a baseball bat in order to save both of their lives. Now thirteen years old, Sharlah has finally moved on. About to be adopted by retired FBI profiler Pierce Quincy and his partner, Rainie Conner, Sharlah loves one thing best about her new family: They are all experts on monsters.

Is he a killer?

Then the call comes in. A double murder at a local gas station, followed by reports of an armed suspect shooting his way through the wilds of Oregon. As Quincy and Rainie race to assist, they are forced to confront mounting evidence: The shooter may very well be Sharlah’s older brother, Telly Ray Nash, and it appears his killing spree has only just begun.

All she knows for sure: He’s back.

As the clock winds down on a massive hunt for Telly, Quincy and Rainie must answer two critical questions: Why after eight years has this young man started killing again? And what does this mean for Sharlah? Once upon a time, Sharlah’s big brother saved her life. Now, she has two questions of her own: Is her brother a hero or a killer? And how much will it cost her new family before they learn the final, shattering truth? Because as Sharlah knows all too well, the biggest danger is the one standing right behind you.

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And then there is another with the word “behind” in it:

Behind Her Eyes, by Sarah Pinborough

 

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Louise is a single mom, a secretary, stuck in a modern-day rut. On a rare night out, she meets a man in a bar and sparks fly. Though he leaves after they kiss, she’s thrilled she finally connected with someone.

When Louise arrives at work on Monday, she meets her new boss, David. The man from the bar. The very married man from the bar…who says the kiss was a terrible mistake, but who still can’t keep his eyes off Louise.

And then Louise bumps into Adele, who’s new to town and in need of a friend. But she also just happens to be married to David. And if you think you know where this story is going, think again, because Behind Her Eyes is like no other book you’ve read before.

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There are many books I’m looking forward to this year….more about those books on another day.

What are you musing about?

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MONDAY SPARKS: MUSING ABOUT LIBRARIES, ETC.

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Happy Monday!  Let’s join Jenn and others at Books and a Beat to muse….

 

  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week…

THIS WEEK’S RANDOM QUESTION: Do you visit your local library regularly? If so, what’s your earliest memory of visiting a library?

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Currently, I’m reading and loving In a Dark, Dark Wood, by Ruth Ware.  My first from this author, but it won’t be my last.

 

 

 

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I was drawn to the cover…and then this part of the blurb:

Leonora, known to some as Lee and others as Nora, is a reclusive crime writer, unwilling to leave her “nest” of an apartment unless it is absolutely necessary. When a friend she hasn’t seen or spoken to in years unexpectedly invites Nora (Lee?) to a weekend away in an eerie glass house deep in the English countryside, she reluctantly agrees to make the trip. Forty-eight hours later, she wakes up in a hospital bed injured but alive, with the knowledge that someone is dead. Wondering not “what happened?” but “what have I done?”, Nora (Lee?) tries to piece together the events of the past weekend. Working to uncover secrets, reveal motives, and find answers, Nora (Lee?) must revisit parts of herself that she would much rather leave buried where they belong: in the past.

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“Reclusive author” resonates with me, as my life often looks like that.  Nesting, cozy, not wanting to go anywhere. 

I am almost finished, and only stopped reading last night because it was very late.

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As for the random question, I have such fond memories of the little village library that was half of a building shared by the Post Office.  I still remember the scent, which I came to love.  My mother took me there whenever she went grocery shopping, and I don’t think I’ve ever had a library experience more wonderful than those firsts.  I explored everything, read many books…and then my mother had to take me to the larger library in the neighboring town.

The first book I checked out and read:  The Adventures of Tom Sawyer!

 

 

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I love remembering my library visits!  I need to do more library explorations, especially now that we can request books online. 

What are you musing about today?

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MONDAY SPARKS: MUSING ABOUT BOOKS

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Welcome to another Monday of Musing, hosted by Jenn, at Books and a Beat.  Here are some topics:

 

  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week…

THIS WEEK’S RANDOM QUESTION: What is your most favorite book from your childhood?

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My current read:  I Let You Go, by Claire Mackintosh, is about a rainy afternoon, when a mother’s life is shattered as her son slips from her grip and runs into the street….

 

 

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I Let You Go follows Jenna Gray as she moves to a ramshackle cottage on the remote Welsh coast, trying to escape the memory of the car accident that plays again and again in her mind and desperate to heal from the loss of her child and the rest of her painful past.
 
At the same time, the novel tracks the pair of Bristol police investigators trying to get to the bottom of this hit-and-run. As they chase down one hopeless lead after another, they find themselves as drawn to each other as they are to the frustrating, twist-filled case before them. Elizabeth Haynes, author of Into the Darkest Corner, says, “I read I Let You Go in two sittings; it made me cry (at least twice), made me gasp out loud (once), and above all made me wish I’d written it . . . a stellar achievement.”

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I’ve heard good things about this book, so I’m going to spend time today immersed in it.

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As for my most favorite childhood book, I might have to say Little Women, as I read it a few times.  But I was also thoroughly engaged by the Nancy Drew mysteries.

I don’t have a print copy of Little Women, as I read library books back then.  I brought no books from my childhood to my own collection, but I do have an e-book of Little Women now.

I also have the first three books in the Nancy Drew series that I bought a few years ago.  See them on the bottom of this stack, below:

 

Books & fairytales - may 16

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What are you musing about today?

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MONDAY SPARKS: MUSING ABOUT BOOKISH THINGS — JUNE 24

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Welcome to another Musing Mondays, where the sparks can fly as we chat about bookish things.  Head on over to Should Be Reading to find out more.

Here are some thoughts to ponder:

• Describe one of your reading habits.
• Tell us what book(s) you recently bought for yourself or someone else, and why you chose that/those book(s).
• What book are you currently desperate to get your hands on? Tell us about it! 
Tell us what you’re reading right now — what you think of it, so far; why you chose it; what you are (or, aren’t) enjoying it.
• Do you have a bookish rant? Something about books or reading (or the industry) that gets your ire up? Share it with us!
• Instead of the above questions, maybe you just want to ramble on about something else pertaining to books — let’s hear it, then!

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Right now, I am reading a memoir by Joyce Carol Oates called A Widow’s Story. 

widow's story

 

I bought the book two years ago, and it’s been resting comfortably on my stacks ever since.  I wanted to read it because it’s Joyce Carol Oates, and it’s a memoir about a very difficult and challenging time in her life.  I was curious about how she would show us what she experienced.  I was sure that she might have something important to share.

Here’s a part of the blurb that grabbed me:

In a work unlike anything she’s written before, National Book Award winner Joyce Carol Oates unveils a poignant, intimate memoir about the unexpected death of her husband of forty-six years and its wrenching, surprising aftermath.

“My husband died, my life collapsed.”

On a February morning in 2008, Joyce Carol Oates drove her ailing husband, Raymond Smith, to the emergency room of the Princeton Medical Center where he was diagnosed with pneumonia. Both Joyce and Ray expected him to be released in a day or two. But in less than a week, even as Joyce was preparing for his discharge, Ray died from a virulent hospital-acquired infection, and Joyce was suddenly faced—totally unprepared—with the stunning reality of widowhood.

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Who among us hasn’t feared those infections that lurk in hospitals, the very places where we hope to find healing?  It is a grim reminder that medical facilities are also flawed, as well as places of care and nurturing.

As I read the book (I am halfway finished), I am captivated by the sheer honesty of the author as she shares her fears, her vulnerabilities, and how being alone has shaken her to her core.

As a bestselling author and the winner of numerous awards, I have never thought of JCO as anything but strong, independent, and able to handle anything.  I had never seen her as “needing” someone as much as she describes her need for her husband.  It lends an extra layer of humanity to someone who is one of the literary greats.

While the story is difficult, sad, and frightening at times, I am glad I am finally reading it.

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What is sparking your musings today?  Come on by and share your thoughts…and links.

 

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